Shaykh Abu Eesa | Victims of Music

MV: 

Source (Shaykh Abu Eesa’s official FB Page):

https://www.facebook.com/AbuEesaPersonal/posts/251191548377353

I feel that some Muslim scholars deal with the topic of music quite poorly – music that right beast which is bliss for the soul, a shudder for the spine, and deep bass to rumble the joints. It has the power and ability to take people and transport them instantly across huge divides and even time gaps back into history. Its effect is vastly under-estimated. Many simply (and rather fortunately!) cannot appreciate the hold music can have over the hearts of its victims.

The problem comes when those who know nothing about music simply to try to write it off as something disgusting, evil and satanic. Sure, much of music might be exactly that in its content, but Muslims don’t get rewarded from abstaining from music in their lives because it’s a meaningless past-time. Rather the reward is proportionate to the huge sacrifice it takes to stay away from something that the soul desires for so much, misses during the lonely times, yearns for during the party times, and weeps over at every other time.

Yet here, the Muslims should count their blessings and be very grateful to our Islam. Alhamdulillah, our Lord gave us something infinitely more perfect, beautiful, melodious and devastatingly impactive upon the soul: al-Qur’an’l-Karim.

Don’t get it wrong: the Qur’an is not a replacement for music. They’re two different genres completely. To compare the two would be disingenuous, and indeed dangerous. Why? Because most folks who love music could listen to the Qur’an for an hour tops, but their favourite music album on repeat for the whole day. If we were to make them direct competitors and hold the believers to account for that, then we’d be bringing kufr to the hearts of millions of believers as opposed to uncovering a sincere struggle. Thankfully the Qur’an doesn’t position itself to go up against music and its attributes. Instead, it is the replacement which *encompasses* music, and so much more. And once you understand this, we remove the kufr from the hearts of the weak, and leave behind just simple guilt. Which is no small achievement, believe me.

Yet there’s always hope for those who like a melody in their ear canals too: for every hip-hop fan, there is a Minshawi. For every Bieber fan, there is an Abdul Basit. For every One Direction fan, there is a Ghamidi. For those who have no-one they cared about in the music industry, “…fallāhu Mawlāhu.”

Can you imagine life without the Qur’an? Can you imagine not being able to just pick it up and read a page and then experience that sensation where one struggles to breathe in amazement at what you’ve just read? Can you imagine having a heart in your chest that hasn’t physically quivered when a certain verse has been recited, even if by the poorest of reciters?

That’s why I feel so *sad* when I hear some music playing somewhere – excellent music at that – from back in the day. I think of all the people who are finding it as stunning as I am, but then having nothing else to turn to as an alternative. What else will they move on to other than to keep replaying the same old tunes and keep propping up the entertainment business, an industry that has no other purpose but to keep it all going, rehashing the same samples, riffs, strings and melodies each year, cover after cover, for as long as possible, to market to a new generation each time and entertain you to death. Literally. I mean, was there *anything* more irritating than hearing kids rave over Vanilla Ice as some original musical supremo with “Ice Ice Baby” as the Bowie/Queen fans cowered furiously in the corner?

This reminder is not about the halal and haram of the issue; those who have been involved with music know only too well that sadly the Islamic ruling changes very little on the inside. No, this is more about understanding that you are leaving something beautiful, addictive and alluring, for that which is *better* for your Akhirah. Have faith in that and place your trust in Allah.

Now set yourself free.

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3 thoughts on “Shaykh Abu Eesa | Victims of Music

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